Summer Legal Job Strategies – Kelsey Pincket, Class of 2017

Securing legal experience after my first year of law school was very different than after my second year. Even though I ended up working in the same city both summers, approaching each summer differently provided me with an opportunity to better evaluate my experiences.

During the summer after your first year of law school there is no pressure on you to find your forever job. At this point in your legal career it is alright if you do not know whether litigation is for you, or whether or not you like environmental law. So, you can use your first summer to explore potential career paths. My advice is to work somewhere that peaks your curiosity. For me, that meant working for a corporation in Daytona Beach, Florida on a wide array of different legal issues.

The summer after your 2L year requires more focus. First, if you are not sure where you would like to live after law school, do some research on those places that you may want to live long-term. Next, select classes during your second year that cover the areas that interest you or you would like to learn more about. For me, this meant heading back to Daytona Beach for a second summer to explore the area, get to know the city better, and work on the legal issues that interested me most. If you do not want to be in the same place you worked after your first year, try another location and use this time to get a better feel for where you might want to be after graduation.

Focusing on the Positive – Lauryn Collier, Class of 2017

Rarely does anyone come across the perfect legal job while in law school. Sometimes it is not what you thought it would be. Sometime the work, the work environment, or the location made for a less than ideal experience. This happens to many of us, but the important thing to remember is to focus on what you learned that can be applied to your next opportunity.

Every new opportunity is a chance to learn or hone a skill, work in a new area, or simply to network with new people while building your collection of legal expertise. If there were issues with co-workers, consider the experience you may have gained managing adversity, conflict, or addressing personnel issues. When the work is not as interesting as you had hoped, consider the opportunity you may have had to better articulate your interests, define what does actually interest you, and think about what you are really passionate about. Evaluating each experience like this will provide you with a chance to actively transfer what you have learned to your next job opportunity.

 Kelsey Pincket, Class of 2017

Student Ambassadors for College of Law Lauryn Collier, Class of 2017

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