Three Things I Thought About Law School That Turned Out Not To Be True

Since the age of twelve I knew that I wanted to go to law school and become a lawyer. As the time grew closer for me to actually apply and attend, I became very anxious about what law school was like. The thought of law school was definitely intimidating and when I arrived I found out that some things I had believed about law school were not true:

You cannot maintain personal relationships while you are in law school: I believed that once you began law school you had to shut yourself up in a room and never come out. Contrary to this belief, I have not only been able to maintain existing relationships outside of law school, but also form new relationships with both my Florida State law school professors, my fellow classmates, and alumni.

The professors are here to make you cry: Before law school, I was under the impression that law school professors were there to tell you how wrong you were and to embarrass you in front of your peers. I have definitely found this not to be true at Florida State. All of my professors are genuinely interested in knowing how we view the material as well as how and why we reach the conclusions we do.

Trust no one: I thought that everyone in law school was focused on making it to the top of the class and would do whatever it took to get there. What I have discovered at Florida State is that while working hard to do the best they can, students also work together to help each other succeed. Whether it is through study groups, mentoring, or student activities, students maintain a very positive and collegial atmosphere at the College of Law.

What I have learned is that law school is not always what you believe it to be. What you read in books or even what others who have been to law school tell you will not always the case. In reality, your law school experience is what you make of it and each person will have an entirely different law school experience, whether at the same or at different law schools.

You will also face choices and how you prioritize things while in law school will affect your overall experience. One example is that if you feel that time spent with a significant other could be better spent studying; you may want to minimize or decide not to have a relationship while in law school. Before coming to law school, and even while choosing a law school, you should take the time to analyze what it is that you want from your law school experience and what areas of your life you want to maintain. If you do this, you will be able to find a good balance and ensure that your law school experience is not what you thought law school would be but what you want it to be.

Student Ambassadors for the College of Law Christina Colbert, 3L